Installation

Add a Dash of Backsplash

Do you think your bathroom or kitchen is missing a certain something? Are you looking for a relatively easy, cost-effective way to jazz it up? Perhaps we’re biased, but a backsplash is a great answer.  It doesn’t just add color- it totally shifts the focal point of the room, making it feel like an entirely new space.  It’s also possible to find product to suit any décor style.  If your taste leans towards the dramatic, a glass blend mosaic would probably do the trick to add the perfect splash of flair:

This customer-submitted photo of her installation of our Tessera Piano Nassau (available through the Home Depot) is proof that a bold mosaic doesn’t necessarily have to dominate the entire look of the room.

However, if you tend to appreciate a little more subtlety, there are a number of more subdued looks up for grabs, even in glass mosaics.  Take a look at this image of our Tessera Subway Blue Smoke: it’s not intrusive, but it adds a welcoming splash of color.

 

The Tessera Blue Smoke installed in a kitchen.

This is available through the Home Depot.

 

Convinced that a backsplash is your ideal solution to a lackluster kitchen? Fantastic! Here are some tips on how to plan one out using typical measurements and points of reference.

How do I Plan a Backsplash?

Start by visualizing it.  It’s usually best to center the backsplash behind a sink or a cooktop- there must be a focal point.  Once the focal point has been determined, use graph paper to plan around outlets, cabinets, windows and appliances.  Though the backsplash should cater to your specific requirements (factor in the practical uses of your kitchen, any storage needs, and physical capabilities of those using the space), the average backsplash is about 15”-18” high- the height from the counter to the base of the upper wall cabinets.

 

How do I calculate square footage?

When installing tile, you will be measuring the required coverage using square feet. This entails measuring the length of the space (in feet) and multiplying it by the width (in feet).  If you are tiling more than one room and require a combined number of square feet, simply measure the square footage of each space individually and add them together.

How much overage should I purchase for my project?

We highly recommend purchasing 10% more tile than the exact calculated square footage. This is to account for cuts, possible breakage, and any future repairs needed- if you need to touch it up later on, the tile may not be available, or what we have may not match your current installation.

When purchasing your tile, please make sure to note the square footage per box or sheet.  They aren’t usually split into an even number of square feet so it’s important to know how much you need.

To calculate your total (including recommended overage), follow this example:

If your backsplash area is 10 feet x 3 feet, you have 30 square feet that need coverage. Move the decimal point over once to the left- that’s 3, which is 10% of 30- and then add that number onto the square footage. You would need to purchase 33 square feet of tile in order to meet your requirements plus to recommended overage.

An advantage to having some leftover tile… maybe you can make your backsplash a little bigger than originally planned! Take a look at this one, which goes all the way to the ceiling:

 

If you’re looking for some stainless steel tile, we have a variety of items that make fantastic backsplashes! Check out our whole selection here.

If you have any questions, as always, get in touch! Don’t forget: take a photo of your beautiful installation of our products and send it over to photos @ merolatile.com- you’ll be entered to win a $25 gift card!

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Installing and Caring for Stainless Steel Tile

Our Meta Steel Hex tile, available on HomeDepot.com

Our Meta Steel Hex tile, available on HomeDepot.com

Did you fall in love earlier this week? Was it with our Product of the Week, stainless steel penny round tiles? We don’t really blame you. It’s a seriously fabulous product. But people are a bit leery at the thought of putting metals in their home, specifically a spot like their walls, which may see a bit of wear and seem a little harder to install. Fear not… it’s a lot less intimidating than it may seem, and it’s worth the research to have such a hardy material in your home! Here are some things to keep in mind when installing and caring for stainless steel tile.

  • Measure the surface area you’ll need to cover, and then add 10% onto that to compensate for any damage or extra cuts (this is generally recommended for all tile purchases and installations).
  • Use a silicone-based adhesive or mastic to stick the mesh-backed tile to the surface where you’re installing it.
  • We also strongly recommend using non-sanded latex-based grout, as sanded grout may scratch the stainless steel top.
  • As with all tile installations, it is extremely advisable to use all new products: a fresh, new sponge; new buckets for grout and water respectively (any leftover residue from past projects may wind up in the grout or the water, potentially scratching the surface of the tile); and a brand new float- preferably the softest you can find, as being gentle during installation is essential to the finished look. Here at the warehouse, we use a float that’s a bit foamy.
  • While sponging as you grout, make sure you go in one orientation (up and down or side to side). Swirling the sponge around may leave stains.
  • If necessary, cut this tile from the rear with a diamond-tipped wet saw to prevent uneven edges. You can then treat and smooth the cut edges with fine sandpaper or a metal file.

Once you’ve successfully completed your beautiful installation, all you need to do to keep it clean is use warm soapy water and a soft, clean sponge! Here is a photo from a customer of our alloy quad tile as a backsplash:

Our Alloy Quad series is available through the Home Depot.

Our Alloy Quad series is available through the Home Depot.

These simple steps will keep your stainless steel tile looking great through the years. Just as you bought stainless steel appliances for their durability, the same goes for tile. With a little upkeep, you’ll have this timeless glinting metal for as long as you like!

 

You can find other general tips about installation here.

 

Source: our resident experts.

Quick Reference Installation Guide

Need some quick pointers but don’t feel like digging through the great wide Internet? Here are some concise tips covering everything from prep to post-installation maintenance.  The tips provided above are suggested guidelines and do not imply warranty.

Our Galan Iris series.

Our Galan Iris series, available through HomeDepot.com.

Tools: Have the right tools and installation products before you begin your mosaic tile installation.  Some of the supplies you may need are a wet saw, tile nippers, trowels, sponges, grout, tile spacers, thinset, gloves, and a few buckets.

Thinset: Be sure to select the correct type of adhesive or thinset suitable for your installation.  Follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of your chosen adhesive.

Cutting Tile: If you need to cut the tile, use tile nippers, tile cutter, or a diamond-tipped wet saw to cut it to a desired size.  Not all cutting tools are suitable for every purpose; please read on for specifics about cutting stainless steel and metal mosaics.

Mesh Backing: Our mosaic tiles have a mesh backing that ensures appropriate bonding during installation.  For optimal performance, avoid exposing the mesh to excessive moisture before installation, which could result in the tiles falling off the mesh backing. For this reason, it may be beneficial to remove the tile from the mesh and cut them individually with tile cutters or nippers rather than with a wet saw.

Stainless Steel and Aluminum Mosaics: You can prevent scratches on these surfaces by using a clean sponge, keeping the protective cover on and applying non-sanded grout during installation. If necessary, cut this tile from the rear with a diamond-tipped wet saw to prevent uneven edges.  Cut edges can then be treated and smoothed with fine sandpaper or a metal file.

Our Meta Steel Hex tile, available on HomeDepot.com

Our Meta Hex stainless steel tile, available on HomeDepot.com.

Grout Selection: Non-sanded grout is recommended for wall applications, products with glass or metal finishes, and installations with a grout joint less than 1/8”.  Sanded grout is recommended for most floor applications and most installations with a grout joint more than 1/8”.

Grout Cleanup: With a dry, lint-free cloth, remove excess grout from the surface of the tile.  Dampen a sponge with warm water and continue to clean grout off of the tile.  Once it appears to be clean, wipe it down again with a fresh damp sponge to remove any grout film. After about 15 minutes, buff the tile with a soft cloth.

Maintenance: The best way to keep your tile looking fresh and new is to engage in regular upkeep.  Keeping sandy dirt (especially from shoes) away from your tile is the best way to protect the surface.  We recommend sweeping daily and using warm soapy water for regular cleaning. Non-acidic and non-abrasive cleansers can also be used for spot cleaning.